Polish Film in Wellington

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Warsaw 44 (2014)  dir. Jan Komasa A big-budget epic tale of youth, love, courage and sacrifice, which takes place during the Warsaw Uprising of 1944 against the German Nazi Occupation. WW2 is coming to an end. Warsaw is still occupied by the Nazis. Young people are tired of suffering. They are hungry for a new life and they want it now. The urge to rebel against the occupiers is overwhelming. On the 1st of August 1944, unarmed citizens start an uprising that lasts 63 days and brings an apocalypse upon the city. Opening Night Gala Screening - with Special Guest, Lead Actress Zofia Wichlacz Screening: Thursday 5 April, 7.30pm

 

The Promised Land (1974) dir. Andrzej Wajda Based on Polish Nobel Prize winner, Władysław Stanisław Reymont’s novel. Set in Łódź at the end of the 19th century as the Polish textile industry flourishes, Wajda explores the story of three fledgling businessmen and the inner emptiness accompanying their drive to make big money. Screening: Friday, 6 April, 8pm

 

Volhynia (2016) dir. Wojciech Smarzowski Volhynia is a name referring to a historic border region of the former Eastern Borderlands of pre-war Poland, and  also a byword for a series of brutal massacres occurring between 1943-1945. Zofia, a young mother, struggles  to save her own life and the lives of her children during the unfolding events triggered by the outbreak of WW2. Set against a sea of hatred, Smarzowski explores love in unhuman times and the value of being humane. Screening: Saturday, 7 April, 2.30pm

Man of Marble (1976) dir. Andrzej Wajda Set in1976 in a repressive Poland. Agnieszka, a film school student, wants to make her graduate documentary film about former proletariat hero Mateusz Birkut. Birkut beat records when he led a 5-man team to lay 30,000 bricks in eight hours but his brilliant career and fame ended suddenly and only to disappear from the record books somewhere in 1952, a victim of the system. Through the project Agnieszka discloses the bitter truth about the 1950s – the period of Stalinism in Poland. Screening: Saturday, 7 April, 5.30pm

 

Nights and Days (1975) dir. Jerzy Antczak A beautiful two-part story about love, an epic saga of the Niechcic family told from a woman's perspective set amidst the Polish social transformations between 1865-1914, after the failure of the January Uprising in 1863. The film presents a unique portrait of an oppressed society, life in exile, and the confiscation of private property as told through the loves and struggles of the Niechcic family. Based on Maria Dąbrowska's novel „Noce i dnie”. Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 2pm

 

Ashes and Diamonds (1958) dir. Andrzej Wajda On the last day of WW2 in a small town in Poland, Polish exiles of war and the occupying Soviet forces confront the beginning of a new day and a new Poland. A masterpiece of international cinema and the landmark of the Polish Film School. Maciek has been ordered to assassinate an incoming commissar. Torn between duty to the national cause and the yearning for a normal life, his progress is stalled which leads him to Krystyna, a beautiful barmaid who gives him a glimpse of what his life could be.  Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 5.30pm

 

The Pianist (2002) dir. Roman Polanski Three-time Academy award winning film. Wladyslaw Szpilman, a famous Polish Jewish pianist, sees Warsaw change gradually as WW2 begins. Forced into the Warsaw Ghetto, where he experiences suffering and humiliation, he is later separated from his family. During the brutal occupation, he eludes deportation and remains in the devastated Warsaw Ghetto where he struggles to stay alive even when cast away from those he loved. He eventually reclaims his artistic gifts, and confronts his fears, through stoicism, some good fortune and the will to survive. Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 7.30p

                                                Newsletter Polish Embassy

Warsaw 44 (2014)  dir. Jan Komasa A big-budget epic tale of youth, love, courage and sacrifice, which takes place during the Warsaw Uprising of 1944 against the German Nazi Occupation. WW2 is coming to an end. Warsaw is still occupied by the Nazis. Young people are tired of suffering. They are hungry for a new life and they want it now. The urge to rebel against the occupiers is overwhelming. On the 1st of August 1944, unarmed citizens start an uprising that lasts 63 days and brings an apocalypse upon the city. Opening Night Gala Screening - with Special Guest, Lead Actress Zofia Wichlacz Screening: Thursday 5 April, 7.30pm

 

The Promised Land (1974) dir. Andrzej Wajda Based on Polish Nobel Prize winner, Władysław Stanisław Reymont’s novel. Set in Łódź at the end of the 19th century as the Polish textile industry flourishes, Wajda explores the story of three fledgling businessmen and the inner emptiness accompanying their drive to make big money. Screening: Friday, 6 April, 8pm

 

Volhynia (2016) dir. Wojciech Smarzowski Volhynia is a name referring to a historic border region of the former Eastern Borderlands of pre-war Poland, and  also a byword for a series of brutal massacres occurring between 1943-1945. Zofia, a young mother, struggles  to save her own life and the lives of her children during the unfolding events triggered by the outbreak of WW2. Set against a sea of hatred, Smarzowski explores love in unhuman times and the value of being humane. Screening: Saturday, 7 April, 2.30pm

Man of Marble (1976) dir. Andrzej Wajda Set in1976 in a repressive Poland. Agnieszka, a film school student, wants to make her graduate documentary film about former proletariat hero Mateusz Birkut. Birkut beat records when he led a 5-man team to lay 30,000 bricks in eight hours but his brilliant career and fame ended suddenly and only to disappear from the record books somewhere in 1952, a victim of the system. Through the project Agnieszka discloses the bitter truth about the 1950s – the period of Stalinism in Poland. Screening: Saturday, 7 April, 5.30pm

 

Nights and Days (1975) dir. Jerzy Antczak A beautiful two-part story about love, an epic saga of the Niechcic family told from a woman's perspective set amidst the Polish social transformations between 1865-1914, after the failure of the January Uprising in 1863. The film presents a unique portrait of an oppressed society, life in exile, and the confiscation of private property as told through the loves and struggles of the Niechcic family. Based on Maria Dąbrowska's novel „Noce i dnie”. Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 2pm

 

Ashes and Diamonds (1958) dir. Andrzej Wajda On the last day of WW2 in a small town in Poland, Polish exiles of war and the occupying Soviet forces confront the beginning of a new day and a new Poland. A masterpiece of international cinema and the landmark of the Polish Film School. Maciek has been ordered to assassinate an incoming commissar. Torn between duty to the national cause and the yearning for a normal life, his progress is stalled which leads him to Krystyna, a beautiful barmaid who gives him a glimpse of what his life could be.  Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 5.30pm

 

The Pianist (2002) dir. Roman Polanski Three-time Academy award winning film. Wladyslaw Szpilman, a famous Polish Jewish pianist, sees Warsaw change gradually as WW2 begins. Forced into the Warsaw Ghetto, where he experiences suffering and humiliation, he is later separated from his family. During the brutal occupation, he eludes deportation and remains in the devastated Warsaw Ghetto where he struggles to stay alive even when cast away from those he loved. He eventually reclaims his artistic gifts, and confronts his fears, through stoicism, some good fortune and the will to survive. Screening: Sunday, 8 April, 7.30p

                                                Newsletter Polish Embassy

 
 
 
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